How typical is the way Dido is portrayed in this passage of the way she is portrayed elsewhere in the Aeneid? (25)

In the passage, the portrayal of Dido can be seen as typical due to her hateful portrayal. In the passage, she is shown to be hateful in the way that “she rushed away, hating him”. This is typical because at the end of Book 4, Dido burns all of Aeneas’ belongings and an effigy of him in her absolute hatred of him for betraying her love. Therefore, the passage is typical as it reinforces this hatefulness and spite of Dido, shown to Aeneas.

In the passage, the portrayal of Dido is typical because she is shown to be a pitiable character. For example, Aeneas pities her with his tears and she is shown to be a victim to Aeneas’ love, whom she ignores in this passage. Elsewhere, this is therefore a typical representation, because the contrast of Dido between Books 3 and 4 show the difference between a strong Queen, with good morality, xenia and grace, who had founded Carthage, but the juxtaposition of an inflamed queen subservient to her love for Aeneas in Book 4 and the rage and disfiguring hatred that follows evokes pity. This is because of how far Dido’s character changes. Therefore, the passage is typical because it too reinforces how far Dido fell from being a great Queen to a quivering wreck for love.

This passage is less typical in its portrayal of Dido, because she is shown as loyal to her husband here. She runs to Sychaeus, who “answered her grief with grief and her love with love”. This kind of loyalty was not shown elsewhere, because Dido herself lamented in Book 4 for her betrayal of her marriage oath, and thus this was one of the reasons for taking her life, as a kind of punishment. Therefore, the passage is less typical as she has became loyal again to her husband, and hateful to Aeneas.

The passage is again less typical because of Dido’s portrayal in her stance to Aeneas. In this passage she is absolutely implacable to Aeneas. This is shown by Virgil’s use of the simile comparing Dido’s reaction to Aeneas’ loving words as “a block of flint”. This sort of implacability is not replicated elsewhere as before, in Book 4, Dido was portrayed as deeply in love with Aeneas, deeply moved by him, as per her conversations with her sister, Anna, who too encourages her to get with Aeneas. Thus, the passage is less typical of Dido’s portrayal, as before the betrayal of Aeneas and her implacability towards him, Dido was deeply moved with her love before Aeneas. Evidence needed: how Dido would hang on Aeneas’ lips as he told his tale

The passage is typical of Dido’s portrayal in this passage, as she is shown as a victim of fate. This is shown by Aeneas’ emphasis on how “it was against my will” and how the divine gods commanded him to leave the island to found Rome. This is similar to elsewhere in the Aeneid, where Dido already senses Aeneas’ compulsion to leave, with a passionate speech denouncing his fateful goal. Thus, the passage is typical because again Dido is shown as a victim of fate.

This passage is less typical as the portrayal of Dido as a leader, caring for her people’s is not found within this passage. Elsewhere, this is found in Dido’s racing mind before her suicide, deciding whether to go with Aeneas. She decides she could not uproot her people again after building Carthage and thus reaffirms her loyalty to her people, caring for them. This is not found in the passage, and is therefore a less typical portrayal of her.

The passage is less typical as Dido is portrayed as a wispy ghost or shade, barely existing. In the passage, she is described as having her “wound still fresh” but also Virgil compares Aeneas seeing her as seeing or thinking he had seen a new moon. This shows Dido as a shade, a spirit that is barely substantial. A ruined figure that has fallen from former glory. Thus, elsewhere, Dido is portrayed as a vivacious young queen, meaning that overall the portrayal of Dido in this passage is less typical.

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